Advertisement

“Call Me MISTER” program coming to McNeese State University

Published: Aug. 5, 2021 at 6:32 AM CDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

Lake Charles, LA (KPLC) - The Call Me MISTER program.

“It was developed by Clemson university about 20 years ago, and it is designed to motivate and encourage men of color, specifically men of color, into elementary and early childhood education,” said the Director of The Center for Advancement of Quality of Education at McNeese State University, Dr. Terri Simpson.

Flash forward 20 years: the program is coming to McNeese State University at the Burton College of Education.

“One of the things that statistics is showing is that students who have good teachers, good role models, who look like them, if you will, tend to do better, they score about 6% higher in mathematics, and about 10% higher in reading,” she said.

Kicking off in Fall 2021, Dr. Simpson says they are the 19th partner school in the nation.

“Our mission at the Burton College of Education is to empower our students to invest in communities and impact the world,” she said. “So Call Me MISTER goes right along with that. We want to have young men who can step in and invest in their communities and impact those communities with better. It’s kind of a grow-your-own, if you will, teaching force.”

She says candidates will have benefits like assigned mentors, support from the university, and a scholarship.

“Right now set at 2,500, which would cover all of their tuition books, and it’s for up to five years,” she said. “So as long as they stay in the program and stay compliant with the guidelines, they’ll receive that scholarship every semester.”

And as for the future of the program at McNeese, she had this to say.

“My hope is that we can continue to expand this program and programs like this, that help people get interested in education.”

For more information, you can email Dr. Angelique Ogea at aogea@mcneese.edu and Dr. Terri Simpson at tsimpson2@mcneese.edu

Copyright 2021 KPLC. All rights reserved.