7Teen Report: ACT Tips - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

7Teen Report: ACT Tips

Reported By:  Karley Picou, 7Teen Reporter

 

Dr. Bobbie Yellott, a professor at Mcneese State University tells the high school students that take her ACT prep course to "breathe slowly, take a few deep breaths.   If you can't work the first one, find one you can work."

She also tells them to never leave an answer blank on the answer sheet.

Yellott says, "On the ACT you're not penalized for wrong answers, so if you see that you're running out of time I always say color in a pretty pattern.   Don't leave anything blank.   If you can, narrow it down to a couple of choices and make an educated guess.   That's definitely to your advantage."

Patricia Clarence, an English teacher at Washington-Marion High School, says students shoud look at the questions before reading the story to save time.

She says, "Read the question first to see what specifically they should be looking for in a passage so that they don't waste time reading everything word for word in the passage."

To increase your ACT scores, teachers also recommend taking the ACT practice test.

Dr. Yellott says, "Practice tests are so important.   A lot of times students are capable of doing the content, but they don't work well for time.   The practice test is setup just like a regular ACT...60 questions, 60 minutes."

There are also things you can do the day of the test to prepare.

Clarence says, "The night before the test, get plenty of rest, don't stay out late at night.   Get up in the morning and have a hearty breakfast, and get to the testing center al least 30 minutes before taking the test."

By following these tips, you'll definitely do your best on the test.

  • More Local NewsNewsMore>>

  • Saharan dust will make for hazy skies this week

    Saharan dust will make for hazy skies this week

    Saharan dust will make for hazy skies this week

    Tuesday, July 25 2017 10:23 AM EDT2017-07-25 14:23:25 GMT
    Saharan dust in the Gulf as seen from satellite imagerySaharan dust in the Gulf as seen from satellite imagery

    The African dust from the Sahara is returning to Southwest Louisiana according to satellite imagery which shows a large concentration of dust and particulate matter encompassing a large chunk of the western and northwestern Gulf of Mexico, including all of Southwest Louisiana.

    More >>

    The African dust from the Sahara is returning to Southwest Louisiana according to satellite imagery which shows a large concentration of dust and particulate matter encompassing a large chunk of the western and northwestern Gulf of Mexico, including all of Southwest Louisiana.

    More >>
  • Host families needed for international exchange students

    Host families needed for international exchange students

    Tuesday, July 25 2017 9:08 AM EDT2017-07-25 13:08:10 GMT
    (Source: KPLC)(Source: KPLC)

    There are currently more than 20 students across the world who want to study in the United States. 

    More >>

    There are currently more than 20 students across the world who want to study in the United States. 

    More >>
  • Lending a Hand: students build prosthetic hand for burn survivor

    Lending a Hand: students build prosthetic hand for burn survivor

    Tuesday, July 25 2017 7:52 AM EDT2017-07-25 11:52:31 GMT
    Engineering design students at Sam Houston High School have spent part of their summer break building a 3D printed prosthetic hand for 12-year-old Bowen Johnson, a burn survivor from Westlake. (Source: KPLC)Engineering design students at Sam Houston High School have spent part of their summer break building a 3D printed prosthetic hand for 12-year-old Bowen Johnson, a burn survivor from Westlake. (Source: KPLC)

    A classroom project is changing the life of a Westlake sixth grader who has no hands. KPLC's Britney Glaser reports engineering design students at Sam Houston High School are seeing in real-life, how technology and heart can combine to help them lend a hand.

    More >>

    A classroom project is changing the life of a Westlake sixth grader who has no hands. KPLC's Britney Glaser reports engineering design students at Sam Houston High School are seeing in real-life, how technology and heart can combine to help them lend a hand.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly