LC firefighter worked with Charleston firefighters who were killed - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

LC firefighter worked with Charleston firefighters who were killed

June 20, 2007
Reported by Pam Dixon

A Lake Charles firefighter worked with five of the nine Charleston firefighters killed Monday. Joel Caillouet returned to Lake Charles in February. KPLC's Pam Dixon talked to him about the brave men he knew and the impact of their deaths.

"It's just a big family, so every guy over there is missing brothers," says Lake Charles firefighter Joel Caillouet. Caillouet worked eight months with the Charleston Fire Department. He could have been among those killed. That was his shift battling that massive furniture store fire. Caillouet says, "It makes you rethink things. I can't say that I would do anything different. If we were in the same situation today and there were people trapped in a building. We'd do the same thing. We'd go in and try to save them."

Caillouet has been back in Lake Charles more than a year, but his memories of his brothers' bravery are still fresh on his mind. Caillouet says, "Whenever stuff got bad, they were there and they wanted to be doing the work and not letting somebody else do it. Especially when there's life at stake. We're trying to keep ourselves safe, but a certain amount of that gets outweighed when human life is at stake."

Lake Charles Fire Chief David Manuel says, "There's a verse in the bible that says there's no greater love for a man than a man who gives his life for someone else. That's what we do. That's what our job is. That's what our calling is." A calling that more than one hundred fire fighters a year give their lives for.

Caillouet plans to attend a memorial service for the nine firefighters Friday morning in Charleston.

  • More Local NewsNewsMore>>

  • Southwest Louisiana Christmas activities

    Southwest Louisiana Christmas activities

    Tuesday, December 12 2017 11:40 AM EST2017-12-12 16:40:00 GMT
    (Source: pablo)(Source: pablo)

    The following is a list of the Christmas activities going on in the area

    More >>

    The following is a list of the Christmas activities going on in the area

    More >>
  • Red Cross offering SWLA free smoke alarms

    Red Cross offering SWLA free smoke alarms

    Tuesday, December 12 2017 5:29 AM EST2017-12-12 10:29:35 GMT
    (Source: Raycom)(Source: Raycom)
    During a house fire, every second counts so, in an effort to reduce the number of house fires across the area, the Red Cross is teaming up with local fire departments to install free smoke alarms. It’s all part of its national 'Home Fire Campaign' in an effort to make sure every resident across Southwest Louisiana has a working smoke alarm. Red Cross says its goal is to reduce death and injury from house fires by 25 percent by 2020. Because during a house fire, every second c...More >>
    During a house fire, every second counts so, in an effort to reduce the number of house fires across the area, the Red Cross is teaming up with local fire departments to install free smoke alarms. It’s all part of its national 'Home Fire Campaign' in an effort to make sure every resident across Southwest Louisiana has a working smoke alarm. Red Cross says its goal is to reduce death and injury from house fires by 25 percent by 2020. Because during a house fire, every second c...More >>
  • Support group for SWLA caregivers offers chance to learn and grow

    Support group for SWLA caregivers offers chance to learn and grow

    Monday, December 11 2017 11:59 PM EST2017-12-12 04:59:55 GMT
    Source: Christian PiekosSource: Christian Piekos

    It might be one of the most under appreciated jobs: caring for a loved one at the end of life.  Sherry Livingston's parents are 85 and 82. They're suffering from Alzheimer's and dementia. "It's a privilege to be able to walk with them in the last days of their journey," said Livingston. "But, it's taken a toll." Livingston said she spends hours every day caring for the basic necessities of her parents. "Seeing them go downhill, they're not the people ...

    More >>

    It might be one of the most under appreciated jobs: caring for a loved one at the end of life.  Sherry Livingston's parents are 85 and 82. They're suffering from Alzheimer's and dementia. "It's a privilege to be able to walk with them in the last days of their journey," said Livingston. "But, it's taken a toll." Livingston said she spends hours every day caring for the basic necessities of her parents. "Seeing them go downhill, they're not the people ...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly