Watching TV Saves a Woman's Life - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

Watching TV Saves a Woman's Life

June 7, 2007

Reported by Laila Morcos

Many say television is a mindless activity that does no good. But KPLC's Laila Morcos has the story of a local woman who tuned in and paid attention during 7News Sunrise and it helped save her life.

Trudy Castille, her daughter Jennifer, and family friend Cheryl have active lives. But every day, Trudy takes time to enjoy the morning.

Castille: "I'm reading the paper and watching the early morning news."

However, one morning while tuning into 7News Sunrise, she saw an interview with local cardiologist Richard Gilmore.

Dr. Gilmore: "I gave a brief talk on the warning signs of heart attack what the discomfort of heart pains may feel like."

That information made Trudy pay attention.

Castille: "I was nauseated and short of breath, and that was two things that he said."

So Trudy immediately brought herself to the ER.

Castille: "And I thought, 'this is ridiculous being here.'  but it wasn't."

Because of hearing our broadcast on KPLC, she came to the ER and in fact had a very ominous looking EKG.

Doctor Gilmore says Trudy's arteries were critically obstructed.

Dr. Gilmore: "She would not have survived much longer."

She had heart by-pass and is doing fine now.

Castille: "I'm back."

Now Trudy and Dr. Gilmore say to pay attention to media and your warning signs.

Dr. Gilmore: "I don't know what would have happened but the risk of her mortality would have been high without intervention."

The warning signs of a heart attack are chest discomfort or discomfort in other areas of the upper body, and shortness of breath. Other signs may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness.

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