Guns from 3D printers are concern to law enforcement

Guns from 3D printers are concern to law enforcement

LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) - Imagine if criminals could use a 3D printer to make guns.

It seems the stuff of science fiction, creating untraceable, undetectable guns.

So much so, that Larry Woodcock has trouble believing it.

"I think that it's an over exaggeration. A plastic weapon still has to be attached to a steel barrel, a steel trigger a steel spring a  steel ejector and it's not going to go past security," he said in a man on the street interview.

Yet videos seem to demonstrate it can be done. Tracey Duhon is outraged at the possibility.

"It's ridiculous. It needs to be outlawed, and I don't like it at all. It needs to be stopped ASAP because it's just bad, it's wrong altogether."

Calcasieu Parish Sheriff's Office Captain Craig Bean says the idea of 3D printed weapons is a big concern.

"Of course we're concerned about these ghost guns, plastic guns. The concern is that they're not detectable, untraceable and it just causes, it's a gateway into another avenue for criminals to possess guns. And that's a concern for us always."

He says the government is going to have to come up with a way to regulate the weapons.

"We in law enforcement support the Second Amendment so we are for gun rights, so we don't want to get sidetracked with that. But this is a concern because of how they can be possessed and who can, as far as the regulation of those, how they're made and where they can get them from, that's just something the government is going to have to regulate and take control of."

For now, judges have prevented instructions from being distributed through the internet, though the final word is still to be decided in the courts.

Attorneys general in eight states filed suit against the Trump Administration on Monday to stop a Texas-based company from publishing instructions for 3D printed guns on its website.

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