7 On your side: Air traffic woes - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

7 On your side: Air traffic woes

     Noise can be stressful and unpleasant-- and residents who live near the Southland Executive Airport say it is so for them.

 "It sounds like we're in a war zone," said Harry Fontenot, who has saved a number of cell phone videos of helicopters and planes passing over his house and yard in Carlyss.

  It may be a rural area, but there are people who live there.  And Fontenot says air traffic is making life miserable.

"We have houses all around here and they just fly right over.  They're not 1000 feet above.  They're like 100 feet over our houses," said Fontenot.   "I've seen them go over 50 feet, 100 feet, you can see my oak trees which may be 40 feet tall and we can see the people in the helicopters.  One of them had a mustache."

 The airport director says if there were any laws or regulations being violated he would report it.  In addition to that, he says those with commercial licenses wouldn't jeopardize their standing by breaking any laws or regulations.

"From my knowledge and from my personal experience watching the aircraft, they aren't violating any laws or regulations.  They wouldn't jeopardize their licensing to do such," said Tim LaFleur, director of Southland Executive Airport.

Still Fontenot insists it's ruining their ability to enjoy their property.

"It's almost every day of the week.  On Easter Sunday, they flew over continuously.  My family and my guests, they left. They couldn't take it anymore," said Fontenot.

Fontenot says his complaints to the local airport board have brought no results.  But LaFleur says they do what they can.

"Helicopters are going to make noise, aircraft are going to make noise.  We try to limit the amount of noise that they make by changing some of the locations that they fly but we can't cut it all out," said LaFleur.

LaFleur says the noise doesn't bother him.

"I don't have a problem with it.  I'm here everyday also and I don't have a problem with it," said LaFleur.

Still Fontenot says they need to go somewhere else.

"We have the helicopters, we have the air planes, we have a guy that comes out in a stunt plane and flies over our house," said Fontenot.  

"I'd like to see the helicopters stay in Lake Charles where they're based, and not come out here I don't want them flying anywhere around our houses.  I thin the airplanes need to fly to the other side of the airport for three miles there's no houses," said Fontenot.

Fontenot says if local officials cannot help them they may have to file a lawsuit to get relief.

Southland Airport Officials say given their population aircraft are allowed to go as low as 500 feet and that helicopters usually fly at an altitude of 1000 feet.

Copyright 2014 KPLC All rights reserved

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