Founder of LaPolitics Weekly dies at age 66 - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

Founder of LaPolitics Weekly dies at age 66

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BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

Founder and Publisher of LaPolitics Weekly, John Maginnis, has died.  He was 66 years old.  Maginnis' staff reports that he passed away early Sunday morning at his New Orleans residence. 

Maginnis worked Louisiana's political beat since 1972, publishing Gris Gris magazine and the Louisiana Political Review. The Louisiana Political Review gave way to The Fax Weekly in 1993, which eventually became LaPolitics Weekly. Maginnis recently expanded the political newsletter and its website, LaPolitics.com, by adding new staff, developing media partnerships and broadening its editorial scope.

His syndicated opinion column has appeared in 21 newspapers around the state. He was also a featured speaker for civic groups and organizations across the Gulf Coast. John was inducted into the Hall of Fame of the LSU Manship School of Mass Communications in 2000. 

Gov. Bobby Jindal commented on Maginnis' passing, saying "For decades, John captured our unique style of politics, and in turn, his work helped shape the debate of where Louisiana should be going in the future. It's safe to say he is the historian on Louisiana politics."

Maginnis had been battling health problems, including a blood disorder, for which he had been seeking treatment, the Times-Picayune newspaper reported.  He also suffered a heart attack several years ago.  

Funeral arrangements are pending and will be announced at a later date.

Copyright 2014 WAFB. All rights reserved.

 

Below is the full statement from Governor Jindal: 

 

"For decades, John captured our unique style of politics, and in turn, his work helped shape the debate of where Louisiana should be going in the future. It's safe to say he is the historian on Louisiana politics.

In no uncertain terms, his work has truly impacted Louisiana culture and politics. Indeed, reading his books and weekly columns should be a rite of passage for anyone who works in Louisiana politics. But even more, if you just love Louisiana, and want to know about our history, John's work is a must read.

John was a fixture around the Capitol, always trying to get to the bottom of an issue. He had an incredible gift that enabled him to uncover stories and narratives that no one was talking about, but would ultimately drive the debate.

His work is prolific, but John could capture the essence of Louisiana politics in a single sentence.

I'm saddened that I will not get to read John's future accounts of Louisiana politics, but I know that I can always pick up a copy of "The Last Hayride" or "Cross to Bear" and take in his fantastic work. John will be greatly missed, but never forgotten."

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