KPLC Remembers: The Romper Room and Miss Brenda - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

KPLC Remembers: The Romper Room and Miss Brenda

Before Sesame Street, the Muppets and Nickelodeon, there was The Romper Room.  Franchised across American TV stations, the program was localized in each market.   Brenda Bachrack was chosen to host the Lake Charles program on KPLC-TV in September of 1962.

"There were desks for the children," said Bachrack.  "Mr. Do Bee was over my shoulder.  We did story time, P. E.  It was a regular classroom between commercials."

The Romper Room was where many Lake Area kids first learned how to count, say their ABCs and even recite the Pledge of Allegiance.

"Very often I would hear from mothers that said it was the first thing their kid would learn watching the program.  ‘I have a 3 year old who is saying the Pledge of Allegiance with you every day, Mrs. Brenda.'"

The show was full of sponsorships with kids drinking Guth Milk and eating Burger Chef hamburgers.  They could get official Romper Room toys at Brousse's Toyland.  Bachrack said goodbye to her viewers at the end of each program with her Magic Mirror, calling out individual names.

"As I walk through the mall, I might be accosted by maybe a half dozen people who were either on the program or remembered seeing it.  They complained because Miss Brenda never saw them in her Magic Mirror."

Bachrack's tenure as host of The Romper Room ended in 1965, when she became pregnant and station management decided that couldn't be shown on local TV.  She said she made $80.00 a week in her hosting duties.

 

Copyright KPLC 2014.  All rights reserved

 

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