Westboro Baptist Church founder Fred Phelps on 'edge of death' - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

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Westboro Baptist Church founder Fred Phelps Sr. 'on the edge of death'

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FILE - In this March 19, 2006 file photo, Rev. Fred Phelps Sr. preaches at his Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka, Kansas. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File) FILE - In this March 19, 2006 file photo, Rev. Fred Phelps Sr. preaches at his Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka, Kansas. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
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TOPEKA, KS (KCTV/AP) -

The Rev. Fred Phelps Sr., who founded a Kansas church that's widely known for its protests at military funerals and anti-gay sentiments, is "on the edge of death," according to Phelps' estranged son.

Phelps, 84, is being cared for in a Shawnee County facility, Westboro Baptist Church spokesman Steve Drain said Sunday. Drain wouldn't identify the facility.

"I can tell you that Fred Phelps is having some health problems," Drain said. "He's an old man, and old people get health problems."

However, in a statement on his Facebook page, Phelps' estranged son said the senior Phelps is now on "the edge of death" at Midland Hospice house in Topeka.

"I'm not sure how I feel about this. Terribly ironic that his devotion to his god ends this way. Destroyed by the monster he made," Nathan Phelps wrote. "I feel sad for all the hurt he's caused so many. I feel sad for those who will lose the grandfather and father they loved. And I'm bitterly angry that my family is blocking the family members who left from seeing him, and saying their good-byes."

Members of the Westboro church, based in Topeka, frequently protest at funerals of soldiers with signs containing messages such as "Thank God for dead soldiers," and "Thank God for 9/11," claiming the deaths are God's punishment for American immorality and tolerance of homosexuality and abortion.

Westboro Baptist, a small group made mostly of Phelps' extended family, inspired a federal law and laws in numerous states limiting picketing at funerals. But in a major free-speech ruling in 2011, the U.S. Supreme Court held that the church and its members couldn't be sued for monetary damages for inflicting pain on grieving families under the First Amendment.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, a civil-rights nonprofit group, has called Westboro Baptist Church a hate group.

Nate Phelps told The Associated Press in a phone interview Sunday night that members of Westboro voted Fred Phelps out of the church last summer, apparently "after some kind of falling out."

Nate Phelps, who broke away from the church 37 years ago, said church members became concerned afterward that his father might harm himself and moved him out of the church, where he and his wife had lived for years. Fred Phelps was moved into a house, stopped eating and since has been moved into hospice care, Nate Phelps said.

The estranged son is in contact with other family members who are also estranged from the church and said two of them managed to visit his father earlier this month.

Drain declined comment Sunday on whether Fred Phelps had been voted out of the church. Drain said Westboro Baptist Church doesn't have a designated leader.

Kansas' leading gay-rights group Sunday urged the gay community to respect the privacy of the "notoriously anti-LGBT" pastor if his health is declining.

Phelps and the members of his church have "harassed" the grieving families of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Kansans and others, Thomas Witt, executive director of Equality Kansas, said in a prepared statement.

But Witt added: "This is our moment as a community to rise above the sorrow, anger and strife he sowed, and to show the world we are caring and compassionate people who respect the privacy and dignity of all."

Nate Phelps said he has no doubt some people would want to protest his father's funeral but added, "I wish they wouldn't."

Equality Kansas urged members of the Kansas, United States and worldwide LGBT communities Sunday to respect the privacy of the family of Fred Phelps.

"If the reports of Fred Phelps' declining health are accurate, then his family and friends are certainly saying their good-byes and preparing to mourn his loss," said Sandra Meade, chairwoman of Equality Kansas. "We ask that everyone understand the solemnity of the occasion, and honor the right of his family and friends to remember and mourn his loss in private without interruption or unseemly celebration. Our focus must remain on our mission: ending discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity."

Equality Kansas has asked that its members, supporters and allies refrain from protests or demonstrations should reports of Fred Phelps' imminent passing prove true.

"For over 20 years, Phelps and the members of his Topeka-based church have harassed the grieving families of LGBT Kansans and others," said Thomas Witt, executive director of Equality Kansas. "He and his followers showed utter disregard for the privacy and grief of others for many years. This is our moment as a community to rise above the sorrow, anger and strife he sowed, and to show the world we are caring and compassionate people who respect the privacy and dignity of all."

Copyright 2014 KCTV (Meredith Corp.) and The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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