I wanna know: Getting typo corrected for 93 year old WWII veter - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

I wanna know: Getting typo corrected for 93-year-old WWII veteran

Source: KPLC Source: KPLC
SULPHUR, LA (KPLC) -

The Louisiana Office of Motor Vehicles doesn't normally make house calls. But they made an exception Thursday to correct a typo in a very special case.

"I wanna know, how do I correct my 93-year-old father's picture ID?" asked Paula Guillory, after being told by an OMV employee she would have to bring her father into the local office.

Francis Richard served in the U.S. Marines and is a veteran of both World War II and the Korean Conflict. Richard is in poor health and in the hospital right now, yet he vividly remembers Guadalcanal, 1943.

"Nine Japanese bombers come over, and they passed right over and we stood up. None of us heard no bombs, We just stood and watched them come ... and overhead we heard the bombs coming," he said while reclining in his hospital bed.

His daughter said he likes to talk about the war.

Considering Richard's sacrifices for his country, Guillory was astounded when OMV insisted he must come into the office, in person, to correct a typographical error on his Louisiana ID.

"He's had three hip replacements on the same hip, he's legally blind, very hard of hearing, has problems swallowing and has recently broken his right arm, which landed him in the hospital,"  Guillory said.

It's a typographical error the family needs corrected for various reasons. And one made by a state employee.

"The picture ID had Frances R. Richard. Francis is his name. We went to the DMV office with copies of the social security card, old driver's license, picture ID that was wrong, Medicare card, Tri-care for life card, everything with 'i-s' proving that it was a typo, a clerical error and we just were met with a, 'Sorry,'" Guillory said.

When it comes to a Louisiana driver's license or ID, Commissioner Stephen Campbell said it's up to citizens to check for mistakes before they leave the state office.

"Our employees, when they issue a credential, the last thing they tell you after they give you the credential is, check it over and make sure the spelling is correct, everything is correct on the document. When you walk out with it, it's yours. At that point, even though we may have made a mistake, it's yours. You've accepted it. So, but we wanna correct it," Campbell said about Richard's ID.

And so, the state has corrected the ID.nPaula, is grateful.

"His age alone, to sit up on a hard wooden bench for two hours or more sometimes just to correct their own error, I thought was a little unbending," Guillory said.

A representative of the Louisiana Office of Motor Vehicles delivered a new state ID to Francis in his hospital room in Sulphur. Still, the case serves as a reminder to always check important documents before you accept them.

To hear more of Richard's recollections from WWII look for the web extra at www.kplctv.comSD

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