Hospital programs ensure new parents know CPR - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

Hospital programs ensure new parents know CPR

NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) -

The story and images of a Florida woman trying to save her young nephew's life after he stopped breathing in the back seat, on a busy interstate, serve as a reminder of how important is it to know what to do.

"That happens a lot more than I think we appreciate, where someone's in a car or a playground, some place where there may not be phone access. There may not be providers who can come as quickly as we'd like," said pediatrician Dr. Brad Strohler.

That's why the women's hospital at Centennial Medical Center in Nashville is one of many that have implemented a new policy. New moms and dads can no longer leave the hospital with their newborn until they know how and when to administer CPR.

"This is at least a little way of putting some power back in the family's hands and say, well now you're better equipped to handle the worst thing that can happen," Strohler said.

And it's a rule new moms like Shea Schroeder welcomes.

"It's always scary to hear them gasping, because you think, 'Oh, my gosh, what have they got in their mouth?'" she said.

Even though she's already been through the training once, Schroeder is eager for her refresher course.

"Having that is sort of a security blanket, to have that training. If it does come to that, you know you can trust yourself to help them," she said.

For more information on CPR training sessions in Middle Tennessee, visit: http://ahainstructornetwork.americanheart.org/AHAECC/classConnector.jsp?pid=ahaecc.classconnector.home.

Copyright 2014 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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