New FDA approved gel for rosacea - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

New FDA approved gel for rosacea

Posted: Updated:
  • HealthMore>>

  • FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    © FDA© FDA
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.More >>
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.More >>
  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
  • 1 in 13 U.S. schoolkids takes psych meds

    1 in 13 U.S. schoolkids takes psych meds

    More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, a new government report shows.More >>
    More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, a new government report shows.More >>

If you struggle to conceal facial redness, you know that the wintertime makes it even more difficult.  cooler, drier air - and holiday eating - aggravates rosacea, a skin disease that can be embarrassing and tough to treat.      

Ginger Royer first noticed her pink cheeks when she was a teen.  "My cheeks would get kind of red and flushed after PE and exercising and running," she said, "in the cold wind, I started to notice that my cheeks would burn a little bit."

That redness only got worse as Ginger got older, becoming something she tried to hide.  "I tried a lot of over-the-counter creams and medications and not much success with those," she said.

Ginger decided to talk to Imperial Health dermatologist Maureen Olivier about the redness and was told she had a chronic, inflammatory skin condition called rosacea.  "It can be manifest as simply a redness or a flushing of the face, or it can progress into having acne type bumps," said Dr. Olivier.

Over the years, dermatologists have managed rosacea with a combination of treatments, from creams and lotions to washes and oral medications.  But that can be limiting to certain patients, including those that are pregnant, like Ginger.  "Some people don't tolerate oral antibiotics very well or just choose not to take them," said Dr. Olivier.

Enter a new prescribed topical gel called "Mirvaso," approved by the Food and Drug Administration in August.  Dr. Olivier calls it a breakthrough in rosacea treatment.  "To be so simple and treat such a difficult problem, cosmetically disturbing problem to many patients, is really an advance," she said.

The medication comes in tubes and just a little bit will go a long way.  It rubs in smooth and clear and can be used under makeup and lotion.  "It keeps my cheeks from getting red again and it helps with the texture of my skin, it feels smoother," said Ginger.

The gel is rubbed onto the forehead, chin, nose and cheeks once a day and lasts for 12 hours, getting to the root of the redness.  "It constricts the blood vessels in the face," said Dr. Olivier, "it's similar to what we use in nose sprays to constrict the blood vessels.:

While it is not a cure for rosacea, Ginger says it is keeping her redness at bay at a time of year it typically flares up.  "I don't have to worry about taking pictures during the holidays, if my cheeks are going to be too red because I have that on," said Ginger, "I had it on for Thanksgiving and my face was fine without the redness."

Mirvaso is covered by some insurances and there is also a savings card available to keep the price around $50.  The common side effects are burning in the skin and sensitivity.

Copyright KPLC 2013.  All rights reserved.

Powered by WorldNow