Participate in clinical trial studying autism genetics - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

Participate in clinical trial studying autism genetics

Posted: Updated:
  • HealthMore>>

  • FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    © FDA© FDA
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.More >>
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.More >>
  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
  • 1 in 13 U.S. schoolkids takes psych meds

    1 in 13 U.S. schoolkids takes psych meds

    More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, a new government report shows.More >>
    More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, a new government report shows.More >>

A new clinical trial is part of potentially groundbreaking research into autism. The result may be a simple blood test that could help diagnose autism in children early.    

In twenty cities across the country, including Houston, kids between the ages of 18 months and five years old are part of a study to potentially prove that you can genetically test for autism. Emory University genetics counselor Meagan Smith explains, "Instead of having early intervention at four or five years of age you could have early intervention at one or two."    

What researchers will be looking for in the children's blood is RNA levels. If your DNA is your instruction manual, your RNA is how those instructions are interpreted and used to make things like the color of your eyes or hair.     

In the end, a tiny vile could change the way autism is diagnosed. "If they can give the doctors a test that can help them rule in or out the possibility of autism, they will be better able to guide doctors on which path to take in making that diagnosis," said Smith.

To be eligible for the closest trial at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston, the children must have been referred to the Autism Center for evaluation, but not yet have an official autism diagnosis yet.     

The children will receive diagnostic testing for autism and other disabilities, an exam by a developmental pediatrician and will have their blood drawn.

Click here for more information.

Here is the information from the clinical trial company's website: 

SynapDx is currently recruiting patients for a clinical study called STORY. The purpose of the study is to develop a blood test that can identify children who are at a higher risk of being diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs). 

STORY will enroll 660 children ages 18 months to 60 months (5 years old) at 20 developmental specialty centers in the US and Canada. This study is specifically recruiting children who have not yet been diagnosed with ASDs. Children who have been previously diagnosed with ASD are not eligible for this study.

Copyright KPLC 2013. All rights reserved.

Powered by WorldNow