Air Force conducting investigation at Northrop Grumman after sev - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

Air Force conducting investigation at Northrop Grumman after severed wires found

LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) -

A U.S. Air Force investigation is currently going on at Northrop Grumman in Lake Charles.

After a week of trying to get information on this investigation, Robins Air Force Base in Georgia finally released a statement to KPLC on Thursday. They did confirm an investigation is being conducted at the site, but many details remain a mystery.

In 2011, Northrop Grumman joined with the Air Force in entering a total system support responsibility agreement. That contract, worth $540 million, made Northrop Grumman the primary contractor of the E-8C Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System, or JSTARS.

According to a statement from the Air Force, the investigation began after a contractor discovered severed wires on a JSTARS aircraft during routine maintenance.

The statement says the Air Force is working with Northrop Grumman to find out what happened, and in a statement from Northrop Grumman to KPLC, they give full support to the Air Force in the investigation.

The JSTARS aircrafts are modified Boeing 707-300 Series and are used for ground surveillance during war. According to the Air Force's website, they have been heavily used during the current war on terror.

The first two were used in 1991 in Operation Desert Storm, and there are currently only 16 in existence in the U.S.

Attempts were made to reach local officials with Northrop Grumman, but I was referred to corporate. In a statement from the corporate office, KPLC was told all further questions would need to be directed to Robins Air Force Base.

Copyright 2012 KPLC. All rights reserved.

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