West Nile cases expected to surge post Isaac - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

West Nile cases expected to surge post Isaac

Posted: Updated:
  • HealthMore>>

  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
  • Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>

While Isaac did not leave behind a big path of destruction in our part of the state, the rain that we received is enough to potentially worsen a deadly problem.  We look into the factors that could cause the incidence of West Nile virus cases to increase even more in the aftermath of Isaac.

Mosquitoes love the rain and Isaac dumped enough across the state to fill up ditches, create more areas of standing water and in effect, lay the groundwork for even more breeding grounds for these insects.

The Centers for Disease Control has reported nearly 1,600 cases of West Nile virus - more than half are in Texas and 145 are in Louisiana.  That is a number concerning to West Calcasieu-Cameron Hospital Infection Control Coordinator, Amanda Bryant.  "145 cases of the disease and nine deaths reported so far," said Bryant.

Nine deaths just this year in Louisiana from a virus that typically does not present with alarming symptoms.  "Normally, the patient will experience fever, fatigue, a general headache, but mainly just the weakness," said Bryant.

Now, with more standing water left behind by Isaac, the mosquito population is only expected to continue to grow.  "That could potentially breed more mosquitoes and then give us that higher risk of the infestation," said Bryant.

West Nile virus can be contracted year-round from infected mosquitoes, but is typically a late summer disease.  Health experts say that is what makes this year's outbreak so alarming, with a full month left until we can see the mosquito population taper off.

No doubt that you have heard the prevention advice time and time again! To lower your risk for contracting West Nile virus, eliminate standing water, wear a mosquito repellant with "deet" and limit time outdoors at dawn and dusk.

Copyright KPLC 2012.  All rights reserved.

Powered by WorldNow