Calcasieu Police Jury urges residents not to drive on flooded ro - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

Calcasieu Police Jury urges residents not to drive on flooded roads

The following is a release from the Calcasieu Parish Police Jury:

NOTICE TO RESIDENTS: DO NOT DRIVE ON FLOODED STREETS

March 22, 2012 – The Calcasieu Parish Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness is urging residents not to drive on any road that is currently flooded.  Emergency and law enforcement agencies have been receiving numerous reports of drivers ignoring barricaded streets and driving their vehicles along flooded areas.

Water depths are unknown when flooding occurs on streets, which can present a dangerous risk impacting the safety of drivers and their passengers. Additionally, the waves caused by vehicles moving along flooded streets can cause damage to property located nearby.

If a temporary barricade is placed on a road, emergency officials ask motorists to obey the warning and find an alternate route. . Drowning is the leading cause of death from flooding. Remember the slogan "Turn around, don't drown."

Over 10 inches of rain fell within the last 24 hour period in western Calcasieu Parish. This unexpectedly large volume of rain is currently affecting both the Sabine River and the Calcasieu Rivers systems. The Sabine River at Deweyville is expected to reach 26.5 feet on Sunday. The Calcasieu River at Sam Houston Jones State Park will reach 8.5 feet on Friday, and the Calcasieu River at Old Town Bay will reach 6.9 feet on Friday.

Residents can pick up sand bags at the following locations:

East Maintenance Facility

5500-B Swift Plant Road

Lake Charles, LA 70615

 

Public Works West Maintenance Facility

2915 Post Oak Road

Sulphur, LA 70663

Residents will need to bring their own shovel and fill their own sandbags.

For any emergencies, call 911.  

For more information, please contact the Calcasieu Parish Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness at 721-3800.

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