Big gator caught at community park - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

Big gator caught at community park

LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) -

It is not something you see everyday, but for alligator hunter George O'Blanc it's just another day on the job as he showed off his latest catch. O'Blanc shot the gator gator after it was caught in a drain in a community park near Prater and Augustus Streets.

Children discovered the gator about a week ago. O'Blanc was called out and baited the hole and waited for the gator to bite. O'Blanc said it took the bait and was hooked last night and was too tired to put up a fight by the time he got out there Sunday afternoon. He explained it has been caught before and will continue to come back especially during dry conditions.

"It has been caught before. You can see this scar on its foot and it has also been tagged," said O'Blanc.  "It's a dangerous gator. Children they are curious and they don't understand these things can and will attack them."

The neighborhood kids were amazed as O'Blanc and his crew dragged the big reptile out of the hole.

"It was cool," said Janiyah Mitchell, 9-years-old. 

"I thought it was a baby," said Antonio Carter, 10-years-old.

"I thought it was going to be like a small one but then today when he came up... I saw it. He was huge," said Joshua Sears, 13-years-old.  

The big gator measured in at 9 feet 9 inches long. The kids weren't the only ones trying to get a look at the gator. Adults gave it the nickname: "Neighborhood Gator." 

O'Blanc has been hunting gators for more than 30 years. He said this one is at least 90 years old and explained how they hunt for prey and defend themselves.

"Feel how sharp the tail is. It is just like a razor blade. That's what he cuts you with when he snaps that tail. The tail is the most dangerous part," said O'Blanc. "They only have three claws on each foot. Their toes are webbed and they use them for swimming and and their tails will guide them."

While the neighborhood said later to the gator who was in the wrong place at the wrong time, O'Blanc is quick to remind them we're the ones who are trespassing.

"Really we are encroaching on their territory. We said they are the nuisance, but we are the nuisance because we are encroaching on their territory," said O'Blanc. 

The park is currently in the process of getting an upgrade. Aside from a new basketball goal, the kids said they would like one of those "Gator on the Go" statues to remind them of their gator.

Copyright 2011 KPLC. All rights reserved.

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