Soap Magic - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

Soap Magic

An infrared sensor works to start the dispenser. An infrared sensor works to start the dispenser.
Liquid is poured into the tank from the top. Liquid is poured into the tank from the top.
The liquid has to reach the "MIN" fill line to work properly. The liquid has to reach the "MIN" fill line to work properly.
The soap dispenses in a thin constant stream. The soap dispenses in a thin constant stream.
The unit lights up and chimes as an option. The unit lights up and chimes as an option.

By Jeff Jumper - bio | email

LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) – The Soap Magic is a new way to get soap into your hands without the manual hand pump.  That's because it's a hands-free, battery operated soap dispenser for use at home.  The batteries are included and it works off of an infrared sensor to dispense certain styles of soaps.  It lights up and has a chime option as well.

Our test liquids include two styles of hand soap, one clear and one thicker creamy one, dish soap, and hand sanitizer gel.  The Soap Magic is not recommended for sue with very thick substances including thicker soaps, as well as any soaps with granules in them.  Also, lotions are not recommended for use with the Soap Magic.  Extremely runny soaps, such as foaming soaps are not recommended for use either.

Up first, I try the hand sanitizer gel.  Using the port in the top of the unit, I fill the tank to just above the minimum level mark.  I have the option of switching from off to ‘on' or ‘chime' which is on with an audible chiming noise.  It takes a few pumps to prime the unit.  Once primed, the hand sanitizer begins to flow in adequate spurts.  It shuts off automatically as well.  I find the shorter the break in-between uses, the more gel it pumps out for each additional use.  The unit stops pumping when you pull your hand away, but some liquid drips below.

Once I get below the minimum line on the tank, the only way to get excess liquid out to change soaps is through the top port.  I wasn't able to empty the sanitizer completely to try a new soap, but adding a different soap only requires a few extra pumps to flush the first liquid from the line.  Our dish soap was unusually thin, so it seems the thinner liquid isn't working well to hold the prime and continue pumping.  I switch to more traditional dish soap with higher viscosity which works fine though.

As far as the two hand soaps, the Soap Magic delivered on its promise of dispensing a good amount of each without a touch.  Again, pulling away before the Soap Magic stops leaves some drippings below.  Despite the potential for some waste from dripping, for our trials, it looks like the Soap Magic cleans up to a YES for this week's "Does it Work?" test.

I bought the Soap Magic at a local store for $19.99.  As stated, it comes with four AAA batteries required to use the dispenser.

Web Extra:  This unit worked well for the typical soaps you would use in your liquid hand soap dispensers.  The sanitizer hand gel I used was about the same thickness as the hand soaps, so it worked fine with the brand we used.  The dish soap was unusually thin.  What happened was once the unit primed with the thin soap for initial use, it would take one to two pumps before the soap would come out again after each trial.  Then it would pump dish liquid and spurt air intermittently.  I emptied the thinner soap and put a thicker brand of dish soap in and it worked perfectly.  Otherwise, the pump makes a bit of noise, but is not much louder than a running sink in some cases.  The light and chime are nice options, but don't seem very necessary.  You have the option to have the pump work with our without the chime.  Be sure to shut off the unit when filling or moving by using the switch on the bottom to avoid any accidental squirts.  We didn't test the battery life of the unit for our test.

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Check out the other products Jeff has tested by clicking here!

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