Shoe Dini - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

Shoe Dini

The standard curved shoe horn head. The standard curved shoe horn head.
Assembly requires screwing together the telescopic handle. Assembly requires screwing together the telescopic handle.
The Shoe Dini works on a few pairs of shoes before the clip snaps. The Shoe Dini works on a few pairs of shoes before the clip snaps.
The clip snapped after use on a pair of thicker casual brown shoes. The clip snapped after use on a pair of thicker casual brown shoes.
The Shoe Dini measures 30.5" in length. The Shoe Dini measures 30.5" in length.

By Jeff Jumper - bio | email

LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) – Shoe horns have been on the market for decades, but the Shoe Dini has a few modifications designed to make getting shoes on your feet just a bit easier.  This shoe horn has your standard sloped horn for its head, but on the back of it you'll find a clip.  The clip is designed to allow this shoe horn to be used not only to get footwear onto your feet, but also to get them off your feet.   If all goes as claimed, you'll no longer have to reach down because the horn is attached to a telescoping handle.

The assembly from packaging involves a few twists to get the base attached to the handle.  To telescope the handle, a twist of the locking mechanism loosens to expand, and locks to hold the handle in place.

For this test, I use a couple pairs of shoes.  First I try some dress shoes.  The Shoe Dini allows me to slip my foot into these dress shoes, without the dreaded "flat tire" to the back of this shoe.  Removing my foot from the shoe with the Shoe Dini also works from a standing position relatively well.  I tried the Shoe Dini with a pair of sneakers, some slip on shoes, and a pair of thicker brown casual shoes before I ran into some trouble.

The Shoe Dini was working as any normal shoe horn, but I did find two issues with it when I was using it.  After only four trials of regular on and off use, the little clip on the back that's supposed to make taking your shoes off easier, snapped right off.  Secondly, just by trying to stand up and use the extended handle with normal pressure, even in the locked position, it keeps sliding right back down to the collapsed position.

The broken clip left a sharp edge on the back of the Shoe Dini horn.  For a pair of ladies heels, it was easier to slip in and out without the help of the Shoe Dini.  As far as the claim that it expands to almost three feet when extended, I measured it to be 30.5", which most would call that 2.5', but I guess they rounded it up to 3'.

The broken clip and collapsing handle cause this Shoe Dini's passing grade to disappear, leaving a NO for this week's "Does it Work?" test.  We found our Shoe Dini at a local business for around $10.  We contacted the Shoe Dini customer support line and gave them the results of our test.  They declined to comment.

Web Extra:  Although I've used similar shoe horns in the past, I thought this one would somehow top them.  The telescoping handle was not helpful in my trials.  I spent more time resetting the handle and locking it thank it would have taken to just use it collapsed.  Also, the back clip broke off so quickly.  It still worked as a she horn, but now there was a dangerously sharp edge on the back to deal with.  The horn part itself worked as any other shoe horn would work, so that part was fine, but the remaining construction flaws made it hard for me to give it a passing grade, so I had to fail it.  Best of luck if you'd like to try it on your own, I'll go back to a hand held horn, or one with a solid handle, or the finger method.

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