Bend-a-Hanger - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

Bend-a-Hanger

The only assembly: screw the metal hanger into the foam handle. The only assembly: screw the metal hanger into the foam handle.
The six assembled Bend-a-Hangers. The six assembled Bend-a-Hangers.
At first, the sweater pulls on the hanger ends eventually leaving hanger bumps. At first, the sweater pulls on the hanger ends eventually leaving hanger bumps.
The lighter weight shirt sits on the upward pointed hanger. The lighter weight shirt sits on the upward pointed hanger.
With the right shape to the hanger, our problems were solved and the Bend-a-Hanger works. With the right shape to the hanger, our problems were solved and the Bend-a-Hanger works.

By Jeff Jumper - bio | email

WESTLAKE, LA (KPLC) - Hangers are cheap and easy to get, but sometimes finding the right hanger to fit the right clothes is not so easy.  The Bend-a-Hanger could solve that problem, if it works.  It claims to conform to hold any type of clothing.

My assembly was a simple, one-step method, repeated five times for all six hangers.  Just screw the metal hook into the foam tube holder.  Done.

I have six Bend-a-Hangers to work with.  I pulled out six styles of garments, including a heavy male sweater, a male polo shirt, two female shirts: one with straps and one with a regular round collar, two dresses: one with thicker straps that are connected across the back and one with thick individual straps. 

For the Bend-a-Hanger use, I found it was relatively easy to bend into a shape.  I bent the sides up, and spun them around to get it to look like a regular hanger.

I started with the sweater first by sliding the Bend-a-Hanger inside the collar.  It was able to support the weight, but I noticed the weight of the sweater pulling on the edges of the hanger.  This may end up leaving hanger marks with time.  The hanger it self hung and held the sweater on the rack without trouble.  I found similar results for the polo shirt and the women's round collar shirt.  With the hanger in the up position, the straps from the female shirt held in place without problems as well.

The heavier dresses were last.  When placed on the hangers bent in an upward position, both dresses pulled the hanger into a downward position.  The dress with the connected traps would have stayed on the hanger over time, but the individual strapped dress would eventually have slid off over time.

It looked like the delicate heavy dresses were no match for the Bend-a-Hanger, but some creative bending found on the box could have changed our luck.  A downward bend first followed by an upward bend turned the problem of gravity into a working solution.  Even the bumps on the sweaters were resolved with some extra bending of the edges.

So in the end, a bend in the right direction earns the Bend-a Hanger a YES for this week's "Does it Work?" test.  We ordered our six-pack of Bend-a-Hangers online for about $8 plus tax and shipping fees.

Web Extra:  The Bend-a-Hanger is constructed of foam around a pliable metal rod, with plastic caps on the edges.  In the center of the foam is a plastic tube where the metal hook is attached for hanging.  This deice is pretty simple to bend at first.  Trying to return it to its original shape is not as easy though.  This would be a nice add on for those special garments that don't seem to sit well on regular hangers, but for a closet full of clothing, the bulk package of store-brand plastic or metal hangers may still be your most cost-effective solution.

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Check out the other products Jeff has tested by clicking here!

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